Viewing entries tagged
Greent IT

       Is 'IT' green?: Colouring    We refined the line in the last post so now its time to add some colour! Use layers like this:     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Photoshop Setup   Start with the wireframe and select the ‘magic wand’ tool. Select the outside of the character and any space between the janitor and the mop. Select 'inverse' and fill white as seen above.  To create an ‘ALT Link layer’ hold down Alt and click between the two layers. The bottom layer becomes a base for the top colour to fit on top of. Add more ALT link layers to the base by using the same process    
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
    
       Red Pen Corrections Colour Pass  The red pen is out in force once again, this time there is less red and it’s taking into account colour too. The changes range from quick fixes to big fixes but it’s all workable. It helps if you do this one character at a time.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     I have taken up the red pen approach PJ introduced to all my work now. I use it to find any defects and fix them. It improves the final quality of the images and acts as a final refinement. It trains your eyes to spot mistakes. You will soon have eyes like a hawk and will be able to spot all kinds of little problems with ease. It will make you a first port of call for critiquing colleague’s work. Tomorrow is the penultimate blog of this series and I'll be looking at final refinements and last minute tweaks - I hope you'll join me!   

Comment

IS 'IT' GREEN?: COLOURING

Colour using layers organised like this:

Comment

       Is 'it' green?: Creating early character silhouettes    Use silhouettes to get your mind thinking in a way that strengthens your characters. When posing a character, it’s a good idea to act them out, in your head or physically. Take reference photos; posing helps you understand the stance and personality better. You can always pose a sketching Doll, or a Biped in 3ds Max, to get a better idea of shape and action lines too.  Action lines or ‘lines of action’ is a method used by animators. If these characters had animation: “what would they do?” It’s useful to think this way. It strengthens the character, giving it life, even if it’s not going to be animated.  Proportions take time to get right! Time was against me due to the amount of characters I had to design from scratch. I utilised a time saving method.. or cheated!. Rather than drawing from eye, I printed out and traced over a BiPed model in 3ds Max. I didn't have a light box or a Cintiq, so I used my computer screen as a light source using tape to keep the paper still. Later, I rescanned it with all the changes I’d made.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Line work refinement (important Illustrator and Photoshop knowledge)  Once happy with your sketches bring them into Adobe Photoshop and focus on tidying the lines. I added colour, thinking it would make it easier on the eyes, I don't recommend doing this as it didn't help in the long run. The colour pass comes after the line work so it’s best not to jump the gun. Stay focused on the lines for now and nothing else.   Adobe Illustrator Line work  Use the pen tool to draw out your lines. I found the inner lines worked best at 2pt and the outside line at 3pt. The thicker outside line helps the character pop.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Red Pen Corrections Line Pass  Always take a step back. Go make yourself a deserved cuppa and come back with fresh eyes. It’s easy to get too close to your work; spending far too long looking at it and not seeing what’s wrong. That’s ok. Step back, ask for someone’s unbiased opinion. My Creative Producer Paul Jennings (PJ), leading the design on this project, has a wealth of knowledge from years of experience managing art teams. He has a super eye for graphic design, alignment and balancing. At this stage I had a form of art blindness and needed his opinion. I couldn’t see what was staring me in the face.  NB: Taking regular brakes can help prevent art blindness.  A Creative Producer red pen pass was just what I needed at this time, highlighting the areas I needed to pay more attention to.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Come back tomorrow for a little about adding colour! 

Comment

IS 'IT' GREEN?: CREATING EARLY CHARACTER SILHOUETTES

Use silhouettes to get your mind thinking in a way that strengthens your characters. When posing a character, it’s a good idea to act them out, in your head or physically. Take reference photos; posing helps you understand the stance and personality better. You can always pose a sketching Doll, or a Biped in 3ds Max, to get a better idea of shape and action lines too. 

Comment

       Is 'it' green?: Research process    Step One - The Research Process    
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
         

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Nicky Rhodes  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Gather a selection of images from a range of artists, depict an assortment of styles in keeping with your art direction. Eventually, you’ll want to start narrowing them down and categorising.  From these inspirations build your moodboard, keep in mind the purpose of your brief. Be sure to add detailed annotations to your moodboard, this will help keep your work focused and streamlined. The ‘Narrowing’ down process will be discussed in greater detail in tomorrow's section so be sure to check back in then.   Case study:    Research outline for  Green IT .   My brief:         Create 6 characters both male and female in a ‘cartoony’ style.   Remember:  your final result will depend on the research you focused on in the beginning. Important direction decisions are made in these early stages.

Comment

IS 'IT' GREEN?: RESEARCH PROCESS

Gather a selection of images from a range of artists, depict an assortment of styles in keeping with your art direction. Eventually, you’ll want to start narrowing them down and categorising.

Comment