Viewing entries tagged
gamification

       Serious Games awards    Here is a list of awards for serious games, its a work in progress so please contact us if you know of any more we can add - or any more detail about submission deadlines for next year's awards...   Games for Change Awards   New York, Applications Closed 2nd March  The Games for Change Awards celebrate the year's best social impact games. There are three categories; Best Gameplay, Most Significant Impact and Most Innovative. Winners are announced at the Games for Change Festival's Awards Ceremony.   Serious Play Conference Awards   Pittsburgh, Deadline for Applications 1st April, Cost $150-350   The Serious Play Conference, now in our 5th year, is a leadership conference for professionals who embrace the idea that games can revolutionize learning. Speakers, who come from all parts of the globe, share their experience creating or using games in the corporation, classroom, healthcare institution, government and military and offer tips on how to move game-based education programs ahead.    German Computer Game Awards (Serious Game Category)   Netherlands, Applications closed 31st January   In the category of Best Serious Game the best Computer Simulation (Serious Game) will be awarded from Germany. Serious Games use technologies from the computer and video game industry, for example, simulation technologies to treat serious issues in a fun way. So you use the motivational and / or entertaining game mechanics for the transfer of skills and knowledge and can be used in education and training. This category can be awarded in other sectors of the economy as an alternative successful examples of playful representation (Gamification) as well as technology transfer from the computer and video game industry. If there is such a distinction, the category is renamed in the respective year in Best Playful representation (Gamification) and Best Technology Transfer. This award is endowed with € 30,000.00.    Serious Play Awards   California, Application Deadline 14th March   The Immersive Learning Research Network (iLRN) is an international organization of developers, educators, and research professionals collaborating to develop the scientific, technical, and applied potential of immersive learning.    The eLearning Awards (Learning Technologies Award Category)   London, Application Deadline 30th September   Celebrating quality, excellence and best practice The Learning and Performance Institute hosts the annual Learning Awards to recognise outstanding examples of high standards, best practice, innovation and excellence in Learning and Development.    The Fun and Serious Game Festival Awards (Serious Game Category)   Spain, Application Deadline TBC but likely to be September 2016   The Fun & Serious Game Festival was established in 2011 to recognise the best fun and serious games of the year and, through them, the work of artists, developers, directors, producers, and all the professionals in the video game industry.    Bilbao (Spain) will be the city of video games thanks to the 5th Fun & Serious Game Festival, which is becoming a leading event in the sector in Europe.    Awards are given to the best video games in entertainment and other industries. The latter are the so-called ‘Serious Games’ using video game technologies in developments for education, health, aerospace, culture and many other sectors.    The awards are meant to debunk stereotypes about video games and give a well-deserved boost to the video game industry.    GALA Conference Awards   Italy, TBC but likely to be October 2016   The GALA Conf SG Awards wants to favor the flourishing of the SGS market by encouraging students, newcomers, amateurs developers and small studio to present their work in a friendly contest. Organized by the Serious Games Society, the awards are based on the judgment of experts of the SGS network.     The experts will evaluate the user experience and the learning effectiveness of the submitted games. Games on any application field are welcome.    Gamification World Awards   Spain, TBC but likely to be October 2016   The Gamification World Awards (GWA) will honor the most outstanding gamification projects of the year and their creators. Awarded by an international Jury, the main goal is to encourage the various agencies/promoters/companies to share their projects in the Gamification World Map. In addition, they are meant to become an annual meeting point for the gamification industry, where the best projects of the year can be recognized.    The Serious Games Showcase and Challenge   Florida, TBC but likely to be September '16   The Serious Games Showcase & Challenge is the premiere venue for recognition of excellence in the field of Serious Games development. The Challenge prides itself on helping foster creativity and innovation in Serious Games since 2006 as part of NTSA's I/ITSEC Conference held in Orlando, FL.    The Brandon Hall Group Excellence in Learning Awards (Learning and Development Category; Best Use of Games and Simulations for Learning)   Florida, Application Deadline 23rd September '16   Now entering its 21st year, the Brandon Hall Group HCM Excellence Awards Program is the most prestigious awards program in the industry.  Often times called the “Academy Awards” by Learning, Talent and Business Executives, the program was one of the first of its kind in the learning industry, which was pioneered in 1994.    The Dutch Game Awards (Serious Game Category)   Netherlands, TBC   The Dutch Game Awards are the professional awards for the Dutch and Flemish gaming industry. On 30 September they are awarded for the eighth time during the Awards Dinner.    The Tech and Learning Awards   TBC likely to be April '16   Tech & Learning's Awards of Excellence program has been recognizing outstanding ed tech products for over 30 years. With a solid reputation in the industry as a long-standing, high-quality program, the AOE recognizes both creative new offerings and significantly updated products that help educators in the business of teaching, training and managing with technology. All entries are given a rigorous test-driving by qualified educators in several rounds of judging. Products are also carefully screened by the T&L editorial team.   Evaluation criteria include the following: quality and effectiveness, ease of use, creative use of technology, and suitability for use in an educational environment.    eLearning Awards - Best Game for Learning Category   London, Application opens March '16 and closes June '16   The E-Learning Awards showcase some of the most recognisable, memorable, and life-changing e-learning worldwide.  They are internationally recognised and open to organisations of all sizes - if you offer outstanding e-learning, then you should be entering the E-Learning Awards!     Independently judged to the highest and most rigorous of standards, there is no greater recognition of your hard work and commitment to e-learning than winning an E-Learning Award.  Reaching the shortlist is really something to shout about. Winning is proof to your, clients, colleagues and rivals that you're at the top of your game – a shining example to the learning and technology world.    Elearning! Learning Champions Award    TBC, likely to be December '16   The first annual Learning! Champion Awards recognizes individuals for exceptional contributions to the industry. Nominees can be innovators, thought-leaders, trail-blazers, mentors, cutting-edge technologists, rookie of the year, creative consultants, or high performing learning leaders that positively impact the learning industry.  Nominate a client, leader or mentor for consideration.    IMGA International Mobile Gaming Awards    EU Applications closed January'16, but applications are open for the IMGA China, Application Deadline September '16   In 2004 games were made for phones with a resolution 176 x 220 pixels and they had to be below 1 MB in size. Now games are running on devices with 2,048 x 1,536 pixels and many games are heavier than 1 GB. The first IMGA had 85 entrants and it took only half a day to judge them. Now, more than 1000 entries are expected and 20 judges will begin pre-judging three weeks before the actual 2-day judging session in France.    Serious Games and Applications for Health - Papers/Demo/Workshops Submission   Florida, TBC but likely to be November'16   It is with great pleasure that we invite you to participate in the 4th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, IEEE SeGAH 2016, to be held in Orlando, at the Center for Emerging Media, University of Central Florida, from May 11-13, 2016.    Game Developers Choice Awards   San Francisco and France, TBC   The Game Developers Choice Awards are the premier accolades for peer recognition in the digital games industry. Each year, the Choice Awards recognize and celebrate the creativity, artistry and technical genius of the finest developers and games created in the last year.     VS- Games, Paper Submissions      Applications close 25th March'16    VSGames 2016 aims to continue the series’ overall goals of developing and nurturing theoretical and academic rigour in the discussion of serious games and virtual worlds.    JCSG   - Serious Games Papers Submission   Australia, Application Deadline May'16   We invite researchers, developers, practitioners, designers, writers and artists of serious games to submit their work and join us at JCSG 2016. Accepted papers are expected to present high quality material that illustrates the broad range of work in serious games and gamification, with particular interest in best practice and field / case studies, but also underlying theories, models, designs, and artwork. We seek submissions on serious games, supported on, or across, any technology and delivery platforms, including traditional or novel, augmented and virtual reality, mobile and location-based, and transmedia, etc.    IITSEC   Application Deadline November '16   To recognize the impact of individuals and teams upon not only the I/ITSEC Conference but the greater Training, Modeling and Simulation Community, a variety of awards and recognitions have been established. Each has its own method of nomination and award process, please select the specific award for details and history.     Serious Games Conf, CeBIT    TBC   Under the heading Virtual & Other Realities the 9th Serious Games Conference (SGC) focuses on Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and other digital application environments. Since 2015 the SGC also looks at Applied Interactive Technoligies (APITs) and therefore integrates the potentials for the industry 4.0. Consequently the conference approaches sociocultural as well as economic potentials in the field of Serious Games and Gamification.    

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SERIOUS GAMES AWARDS

Here is a list of awards for serious games, its a work in progress so please contact us if you know of any more we can add - or any more detail about submission deadlines for next year's awards...

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       Wait...games are good for you?   It seems there are new risks to our health being discovered every week. Everything is a risk, from stuttering car exhausts to the calming flicker of a candle! Our bodies are under constant attack and it us up to each of us to protect ourselves from these risks as best we can.  I can hear some of you guys sighing right now. Don’t worry, this isn’t a sermon. We are going to look at how games (yes games obviously!) can help you maintain a healthy lifestyle and even aid recovery for certain ailments. Afterwards we'll take a quick look at new technologies the medical community are using to improve healthcare.  Let’s dive in.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     We all know “prevention is better than the cure”. Leading a healthy lifestyle and looking after yourself gives you the best chance at fighting any future health issues and avoiding a world of others. One aspect of a healthy lifestyle is, of course, our fitness.  According to the  Mayo Clinic  healthy adults should “ get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity… ” If you are like me and class exercising as a chore but do have a soft spot for relentless hoards of the undead, then there is a serious game for you! Introducing  Zombie Run ! This Kickstarter success story has been around for 5 years improving the health and fitness of their players regardless of their initial fitness level. Set your exercise activity, stick in some earphones and dive into a captivating Zombie epic. The compelling storyline motivates you to push yourself harder. The reward of the next chapter makes sure you are eagerly awaiting your next training session, not dreading it! It is a great way to improve your fitness.              

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


              Hand in hand with fitness is diet.  We need food to survive and everyone knows sugary, fatty or greasy foods aren’t good for you. So what is? I’ll be honest. I really wanted (and tried very hard) to find a serious game that focused on this area and was available to play. A few titles cropped up in my search ‘JiveHealth’ looks like a great game for kids. ‘Yummy tricks’ was another game that cropped up but, like JiveHealth, wasn’t available to play. If you have suggestions of serious games which promote healthy eating please drop us a line into the comment section.  Moving swiftly on we have  SuperBetter . A game designed to increase your resilience, basically game your way to a (cue Daft Punk) better, stronger, motivated and positive you. Just ten minutes a day playing SuperBetter can add years onto your life. It reduces the symptoms of anxiety and depression, cultivating your self-esteem and confidence. SuperBetter is just one of the games out there helping people take care of their emotional and physical wellbeing.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Delving in to the more niche uses of serious games, we have  Re-Mission .  Re-Mission was mentioned previously in one of our posts but it is a serious game worth mentioning twice! Re-Mission was developed to help children diagnosed with cancer. Through gameplay it teaches kids about their cancer and the importance medicine plays in recovery. It works at changing attitudes towards chemotherapy so it becomes a positive experience. Studies showed that playing Re-Mission, patients understood more about their disease and were more compliant with their treatment.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     This is just one example where serious games are helping people on their way to recovery. There are other serious games that focus on different diseases, physical trauma and on-going health issues. Serious  Games for Health  have collated a short list of resources.  There are serious games on there that are used in rehabilitation for patients with physical difficulties,  promoting mobility in the elderly, even Tetris is listed as a treatment for lazy eye syndrome. It always amazes me the health benefits people can get from playing games!  Before starting my research I foresaw serious game mainly being utilised as a training tool for health professionals. I’m not saying I thought surgeons were practicing procedures using Surgeon Simulator! ( Comedic gore alert !) But I had the preconception that serious games would be used exclusively for professional training but I’m happy to report I was wrong. Of course there are some serious games that are used to enhance professional medical training but the majority are for your average Joe who wants to lead a healthier lifestyle, speed up their recovery or better understand any ailments they might have. It is really encouraging to see games being used this way.  I had the same preconceptions about Virtual Reality and its uses in healthcare. In my mind, doctors would be diagnosing AI patients, maybe even practicing rare procedures in Virtual Reality simulations. But there is so much more out there and it is growing in popularity. By 2018 it is estimated to be a $2.4bn industry!     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Take CPR for example. There are already games that focus on training its players to perform CPR in real life should the need arise. Games like  AED Training  and  Hands Only  heavily focus on the actual CPR methodology. I’ll be honest they are basic and a little underwhelming on the graphics and storyline but they get the job done at the end of the day. They provide an avenue for people to learn CPR and for First Aiders to keep their knowledge up-to-date. But for people who want to learn CPR where the entertainment value is important too,  Relive  is the game for you. There is a captivating storyline, comic book style graphics and a whole lot of Sci-fi thrown in for good measure. The game is free to download via Steam so everyone can learn the basics of CPR and hopefully that will prompt them to seriously consider First Aid training. There is also a virtual reality aspect to Relive. Using an Oculus Rift and a mini-VREM (Virtual Reality Enhanced Mannequin) players perform CPR on the mannequin but as if they are in the game environment.  It is such an intriguing area; I’m really looking forward to more games that use virtual reality headsets and other peripherals to bring medical and first aid training to the masses.              

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


              For some more ideas about what’s to come I fully recommend giving this article a  read . For other successes in the VR/Health sector, read how serious games are being incorporated into Stroke patients rehabilitation  here .   If any of you have food/fitness/healthcare serious games you love, please leave a comment and let us know all about them. 

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WAIT...GAMES ARE GOOD FOR YOU?

It seems there are new risks to our health being discovered every week. Everything is a risk, from stuttering car exhausts to the calming flicker of a candle! Our bodies are under constant attack and it us up to each of us to protect ourselves from these risks as best we can.

I can hear some of you guys sighing right now. Don’t worry. . .

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       The 'How Not To' Game    Our partners  How Not 2    create some great video training on how not to do certain skills such as coaching, reviews or difficult conversations. Now our friends over at the FBI have released a game that could basically be a how not to create a serious game.  I have no qualms with their intention – helping young people avoid radicalisation is a good cause but I have issues with the way they have gone about it.  I’m not going to comment a lot on the content but just a few points that struck me… Leaving aside the graphical treatment as we’ll come onto that below– the content delivery is all tell tell tell. There’s no discovery. At the end of the day it’s a fancy menu. There is no connection between game play and content at all, it might as well not be there.  The approach and delivery apart from being patronising and alienating, with community leaders  speaking out strongly against the messages  the site has some really questionable messages:  The radicalisation of young people is a very complex subject matter and the site is based around the concept of don’t be a puppet – well I’m pretty sure if you are on your way to being radicalised then you might well see the US government as being the puppet master and western citizens as the puppets so to me, that doesn’t work.  And you play the game element as a goat… I mean who thought that would be a good idea?  The game design itself is a mixed collection of genres and metaphors as well as technologies and immersion breaking gaffs.         

 
   
     
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              Screenshot from Slippery Slope game  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     The first element of the experience is an endless runner, or as PJ our creative producer calls it an “endless goater”, where you play a goat, which looks like it could have escaped from Minecraft, avoiding blocks and if you pass a level you get a message about 1 of the 6 steps of the slippery slope of radicalisation. Now I have no beef (or should that be goat) with this style of graphics – Minecraft is incredibly popular after all, so I see where they were going with it, but 3 issues here:  1)      You play a goat… WTH?  2)      The goat is named Poonikins. Poonikins was a mod that introduced a homicidal horse into GTA IV. To see what the horse got up to check out this  video  . So let’s get this straight… you play a character named after a homicidal animal on the slippery slope…. Hmmm  3)      You play on a tablet with PC controls (hmmm) and then when the game is over you zoom out from a Game Boy… but I was just on a tablet. Have I just time travelled. Why!?!?  After the Endless ‘Goater’, you transition into this swishy main interface which zooms round some kind of abandoned garage/underground bunker – this bit I kinda like as there’s a lot of detail and the transitions are quite nice…     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Main room interface  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     ….but then when you get into each section it’s just boring elearning, drag and drop and what makes it worse is that you go from a detailed environment to an interface that has had absolutely no graphical treatment whatsoever – it’s like they couldn’t be bothered!      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Groupthink elearning section - this'll go viral for sure!  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     I ‘ve said before that making good games and good interactions is quite difficult, but seriously – there have been so many rules broken in this one experience it’s almost like a game to spot them themselves.  However the number one, fundamental rule that has been broken here is understanding your audience. Only use a game approach if it will benefit the message – never shoe horn in game mechanics as it’s the cool thing to do, or because kids like games so let’s use one… it just doesn’t work like that.  Games are not suitable for everything, but there have been some great games produced which talk about some pretty serious messages related to war that could be used to spark deeper more useful discussions such as  This War Of Mine  created by 11bitstudios.       
   
     “ This War Of Mine provides an experience of war seen from an entirely new angle. For the very first time you do not play as an elite soldier, rather a group of civilians trying to survive in a besieged city. During the day snipers outside stop you from leaving your refuge, so you need to focus on maintaining your hideout. At night you get a chance to scavenge nearby locations for items that will help you stay alive. Make life-and-death decisions driven by your conscience. Try to protect everybody from your shelter or sacrifice some of them to endure the hardships. During war, there are no good or bad decisions; there is only survival. The sooner you realize that, the better.  ” 
   
  
 
     Or how about September 12th described by  Games for Change  as      
   
     “ The New York Times described September 12th as “An Op-Ed composed not of words but of actions”. This newsgame became a viral hit by exposing the futility of the US-led War on Terror. Created by a team of Uruguayan game developers lead by a former CNN journalist, this was the first game of the series that coined the term newsgame. The project’s main idea was to use the language of videogames to describe current events while conveying a timeless maxim: violence begets more violence. The player controls what seems to be a sniper rifle target but, when clicked, launches missiles. The bombs not only kill the terrorists but also generate so-called “collateral damage”. When civilians mourn the innocent dead they soon turn into terrorists. After a couple of minutes, this Middle-Eastern village is destroyed and crawling with terrorists. The player soon realizes that there is no way to win the game through shooting. The game’s main goal was not to convince people that the War on Terror was wrong. Instead, it aimed at triggering discussion among young players.   ” 
   
  
 
    
 So there are better ways to get the message across, to spark debate and have meaningful and enlightening conversations. Overall it seems the funders and producers of this game experience haven’t really thought through all the implications of the messages and delivery medium but they have given us a good case study of how not to create a serious game. 

1 Comment

THE 'HOW NOT TO' GAME

Our friends over at the FBI have released a game that could basically be a how not to create a serious game.

I have no qualms with their intention – helping young people avoid radicalisation is a good cause but I have issues with the way they have gone about it. 

1 Comment

       Take a look at our infographic!    The infographic below illustrates how our new 3D, online, multiplayer game uses learning psychology together with game mechanics to deliver an engaging, immersive, learning experience designed to develop leadership capabilities.  Scroll down to see how the narrative unravels; After a raging storm, you (the player), find yourself shipwrecked, alone on  a mysterious island. Proceed through a series of 'levels' each challenging different skills - as you progress, you'll discover that you are in fact, not alone but must work with others to achieve your common goal.  The final part of the graphic details the design thinking behind the game, Originally designed by our head of design and production, Helen Routledge, author of  "Why Games Are Good For Business, How to Leverage the Power of Serious Games, Gamification and Simulations" Published by Palgrave Macmillan.    The game can be compared to a sandbox style game in that it provides the foundation (or bones) of the experience, it is the interaction of the four players, playing simultaneously within the game world that creates unique experiences and learning opportunities with each play.  If you're interested in seeing a little more of the actual in-game graphics and puzzles - check out our  video , or  get in touch  to try the game for yourself!

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TAKE A LOOK AT OUR INFOGRAPHIC!

The infographic below illustrates how our new 3D, online, multiplayer game uses learning psychology together with game mechanics to deliver an engaging, immersive, learning experience designed to develop leadership capabilities.

Scroll down to see how the narrative unravels; After a raging storm, you (the player), find yourself shipwrecked, alone on  a mysterious island. Proceed through a series of 'levels' each challenging different

Comment

       Levelling up Leadership with serious games    Leadership, like many other soft topics which are classed as critical 21st Century skills is a tough nut to crack. There is only so much theory one can learn about a soft skill before you need to bite the bullet and head out to the real world to practice your new found knowledge. But therein lies a challenge; to practice leadership skills you need people to lead and said people may not be immediately available. And to top it off, if you turn out to be a poor leader, you risk widespread damage amongst the team.  So how can we address leadership development using games? Or to put it another way how can a game produce a better leader? Using the lessons Totem Learning learned from the development of a multiplayer leadership game I wanted to share the top tips on how games can help build this critical skill.   The top 3 areas where I believe games can bring real benefit to leadership development are;   To allow skills practice  To observe emerging leadership skills  To evaluate leadership capabilities   Those 3 criteria really became the foundation for a leadership game which I absolutely loved designing and love seeing people play.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Early cardboard mock-up of one of the puzzles in the game  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     From my own perspective when I sat down to design a leadership game, it was really important that every person in that game had the opportunity to become the leader during at least one point in the game. I didn’t want to create a game where there was a leader role and the rest of the team were forced into the follower category.  So that was my first challenge. How was I going to create an environment where there were multiple leaders? Well who’s to say that your role in a game stays the same from start to finish? Why can’t it evolve and change? I felt this was a good reflection of reality in that we all have our strengths and weaknesses and our jobs change overtime. So that revelation really set the foundation for the structure and flow of the game moving forward. I knew I wanted to create a scenario where the game changed, roles were fluid and opportunities were aplenty for those willing to grab them.  Provide the raw information about the situation and see what conclusions are drawn  The design incorporated changing the nature of the connections between the team members throughout the experience. They began as single players, isolated from one another, and so there was great individual responsibility. Gradually we built mini teams by introducing players to one another over time, before connecting them all together into one homogenous team.  The benefit this design decision brought was that each player made their own conclusions about the environment, even though every player started off with the same experience. This was a great eye opener into how each of the team members felt about individual working and reading their environments.  Introduce Multiple Goals  As in the real world, leaders have to balance differing priorities and goals. In our game design we represented this through personal and team goals; through setting up an initial competitive environment, where you were in a race against other players to reach the goal. But over time we introduced the concept that the final goal could not be achieved alone. It was very interesting to see how players reacted to sacrificing their personal gain for the benefit of the team.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Players need to collaborate  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Use pressure techniques to explore behaviour in different scenarios  Throughout the game, players were faced with the overarching goal of escape and completion but also a series of challenging puzzles along the way to push their individual coaching, team and leadership skills. We applied time pressure to these situations where the faster the problem was addressed the more points the team received. As well as these pressurised situations we mixed in non-pressure situations where they had time and no consequences to solve problems. Using a mix of these situations we could assess how each player behaved differently.  Make sure you have a solid foundation  Throughout the design we underpinned the game design with a foundation of leadership development strategy crafted by subject matter experts.  Leadership is about getting others to do things by creating the environment where progress is possible. In our game design, progress was not possible unless the player cooperated: setting aside personal gain for the good of the team. We built in situations where innovative responses were required from the players, often under pressure and in non-routine situations. Influencing skills were an essential ability team members required to ensure a high score.  Another critical aspect of leadership is coaching, a method of directing, instructing and training a person or group of people, with the aim to achieve some goal or develop specific skills. We built in specific scenarios where users had to coach others through situations. These puzzles involved;     Identifying goals  Removing obstacles  Generating options  Planning actions  Actioning the plan   It was important for us to give everyone an opportunity to coach so we always provided opportunities to repeat skills and practice, but in new contexts therefore reinforcing strategies and behaviours.    Problem solving was a core component to the game. A definition of problem solving is that an individual or a team applies knowledge, skills, and understanding to achieve a desired outcome in an unfamiliar situation. Problem solving is central to many games and underpins many of the design decisions we made.  We wanted our players to objectively identify possible causes of a problem and then proposing potential, often creative, solutions to the team. The great thing about using problem solving in games is that it leads to permanent information retention because you come to the conclusion yourself; you make your own connections rather than being told the correct answer. Problem solving is the opposite of memorization where information is often forgotten after testing.  The final component that was important to our foundation was that we had to make the team feel like a team quickly! We had to give the players a common purpose to (finally) align their efforts to. This was achieved through the use of the storyline, repeating subtly through the game the need to work together, the gradual connection of players into the overall team and the gradual increase in difficulty level, building camaraderie.   And finally give good feedback!     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     A sandbox, experimental environment, is no good without guidance and feedback. Because we wanted this game to be used without the need for a facilitator to be present, we had to make sure the game provided all the feedback that was needed. Through the process of highlighting successes and learning from mistakes we were able to bring about a new level of personal effectiveness.   Read more on Unlock: Leadership  

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LEVELLING UP LEADERSHIP WITH SERIOUS GAMES

Leadership, like many other soft topics which are classed as critical 21st Century skills is a tough nut to crack. There is only so much theory one can learn about a soft skill before you need to bite the bullet and head out to the real world to practice your new found knowledge. But therein lies a challenge; to practice leadership skills you need people to lead and said people may not be immediately available. And to top it off, if you turn out to be a poor leader, you risk widespread damage amongst the team.

So how can we address leadership development using games?

Comment